How to choose a driving instructor?

How to choose a driving instructor? Finding the right driving instructor can be hard. You have to spend a lot of time with this person, you have to be able to talk to them and take direction from them. So we’ve put together a few things to consider whilst looking for your perfect instructor.

1) Ask a friend! Your friends know you and they’ll know if you’ll get on with their instructor or an instructor they know.

2) The bus test. If your instructor sat next to you on the bus would you move or would you stay sat next to them? If you’d move, they’re probably not the instructor for you.

3) Reviews. In today’s world of information overload, reviews are a great way of getting answers to your questions from real people. If a driving instructor has lots of reviews, they’re probably doing something right!

4)  Professionalism is important. You are paying your instructor for a professional service, so as much as you need to get along with your instructor, they need to be professional too. Professionalism can be shown in lots of different ways. For example, at driving-pro, our instructors like to dress professionally. They also make sure their cars are clean both inside and out.

5) Answering the phone. If you phone an instructor directly and they don’t answer first thing, that’s a good thing! They’re probably out driving and respecting the fact they’re working. Just leave a message and they’ll get back to you!

The Secret Driving Instructor:

As an instructor, I prefer to speak to people over the phone. Old school, I know. Talking on the phone gives instructors a better idea of what you’re looking for and what you need without a long back and forth. It means we can give a better and more bespoke service.

6) Code of Conduct. Has your chosen instructor signed a Code of Conduct? Ask this question! You should also find out if your instructor has terms and conditions, you’ll then both be on the same page!

7) Do you feel comfortable with your instructor? If you don’t, we suggest finding a new instructor. There’s nothing wrong with that! At driving-pro all of our students know that if they ever have an issue or they’d like to speak to someone who is not their instructor, they are able to. We want our students to be comfortable.

The Secret Driving Instructor:

There have been times in my career when I’ve had to pass on students to another instructor or suggest we terminate lessons because I haven’t got on with the pupil! Feeling comfortable works both ways.

8) Don’t get hung up on pass rates. It’s easy to, we know. You will pass your test. You will pass your test in your own time, and it mainly comes down to your commitment, the amount of miles spent on the road and your confidence.
9) Instructor grade. There are two grades, A and B. The grade is supplied by the government. At driving-pro although we take grades into account most important for us is professionalism, people skills, ability and teaching methods.

10) Price. Learning to drive is an investment. Of course cheap lessons or deals such as ten hours for £99 or the first five for £55 are attractive but ask yourself why these lessons are so cheap. A good and in demand driving instructor will charge appropriately for their service which ultimately could end up costing you less.

The Secret Driving Instructor:

The Secret Driving Instructor - Having spent many years in the industry I’ve learnt that there are many reasons how and why there a schools and instructors that charge so cheaply for lessons, and these reasons aren’t good.

If you want to find out more about any of driving-pro’s instructors, you can give us a call on 02393 75 25 25 or check out their profiles on the website!

Next week we’ll be looking at more Tell Me questions (yes, there’s more) but you’ll be a Tell Me Pro in no time!

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02392 752 525

The Law and learning to drive

Are you thinking about learning to drive? There are a few things you need to consider before you get on the road.

An overview:

  • In the UK you have to be 17 years old to learn how to drive
  • You must have a provisional driving license
  • You must have insurance when learning to drive with friends and family
  • You must display L Plates when you’re learning
  • You must be accompanied when driving on a provisional license

 

The Licence:

The first thing you are going to need is a provisional driving licence. You can apply for this before you are 17 so it is possible to have a driving lesson on your 17th birthday. You can either go to The Post Office or get it online from GOV.UK.

So you know: If you are driving on an overseas licence you have one year from your time of entry into the UK.

The Secret Driving Instructor:

Because of the various checks that go into a driving licence, it becomes a very valid identity document. In addition, there is an online checking service where people can check your license is legitimate. As a driving instructor, I am normally too lazy to use this. But give me the slightest hint something is not right and I will be checking.

Insurance:

Go with a professional instructor and your insurance worries are over.

If you are using a family or friends car you must check. The person sat next to you must be over 21 and have had a licence for 3 years. Some companies say that the supervising driver must be over 25. Not having the right supervisor can get you fined £1,000 and 6 penalty points.

The average motor insurance claim is around the £3,000 mark. Some claims are an awful lot higher. Having no insurance or invalid insurance could mean an unlimited fine and 8 points on your licence.

You must tell your insurance company everything. If you don’t and things go wrong, you’ll be in trouble.

The Secret Driving Instructor:

Being sat next to me is the safest you’re going to as a driver for a long time. This is reflected in my insurance which is fully comprehensive with hire and reward and I pay under £500 a year.

Car:

If you are a learner you must display ‘L’ plates on the front and back of my car. They should be placed on the driver’s side of the car to make them more easily seen by the other drivers.

Buy them, don’t make them as they must be a certain size and shape so everyone can recognise them. They should be removed when not being used. Professional driving instructors are allowed to keep them on.

You can buy ‘L’ plates from places such as big supermarkets and petrol stations.

The Secret Driving Instructor:

My car is covered in ‘L’ plates, forward, behind, both sides and on top. No one has the excuse of not knowing mine is a learner car. I am very careful about what I do.

Instructor:

Anyone can teach you to drive, but only a professional driving instructor can take money from you for doing that. The school of mum and dad can be great for practising outside of lessons, just make sure you have the correct insurance, your ‘L’ plates and your provisional license.

The Secret Driving Instructor:

Like a lot of my instructor friends, it’s frustrating when we hear of non-professionals charging students. We worked hard to get where we are and we make sure that everything is safe: proper insurance and duel controls. We train to instruct and if we are any good, keep training. The government also carries out regular checks to make sure you, as a learner are safe.

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Looking for a driving school with a high pass rate and a great reputation?

02392 752 525

Want to Learn to Drive?

What questions should you be asking? What answers should you get? Can I do it?

Commitment is key. You will need to put aside time, money and be prepared to make the effort.

1.What about the money.

Who is paying?

Are you being given a block of lessons as a present? Can you afford to carry on after that?

The Secret Driving Instructor:

Lots of people start when someone else has paid but not everyone can keep it up. Also, keep in mind that someone that stops and starts, spends more money over a longer period of time.

2.What about the time?

First off it will take time. Just because your friend passed in 15 lessons doesn’t mean you will. Everyone is different. When it comes to learning to drive, there are no guarantees and you should trust that your instructor has your best interests and safety in mind when they advise on when to take your driving test.

The Secret Driving Instructor:

Not everyone realises how long it takes nowadays. The DVLA suggest a pupil is ready to take their test after 47 tuition hours and 22 hours of private practice. That’s 70 hours behind a wheel and that’s the average!

Secondly what time do you have to do it?  It’s good to have a regular time but as you progress it’s valuable to be flexible and practice at different times of the day to get experience.

The Secret Driving Instructor:

A regular time for a regular pupil makes it easy for both of us. No excuse for forgetting which can happen but be aware that your driving instructor will charge if you’re not there. It’s their living after all.

3.What about effort?

The desire to learn is essential as well as the ability to work for it. This means you need to be on time for your lessons. Be ready for them. Listen to what your instructor tells you and act upon it. Think about driving between your lessons if you can. Keep a diary and write about your lesson afterwards (it’s called a reflective log), and don’t forget to ask questions.

Request A Callback

Looking for a driving school with a high pass rate and a great reputation?

02392 752 525

Learning to Drive: How to Choose a Driving Instructor

Finding the right driving instructor for you can be hard. You have to spend a lot of time with your driving instructor, you have to be able to talk to them and take direction from them. So we’ve put together a handy list of 10 things to consider whilst you’re looking for your perfect driving instructor.

1) Ask a friend! Your friends know you and they’ll know if you’ll get on with their driving instructor or an instructor they might know.

2) The bus test. If your driving instructor sat next to you on the bus, would you move or would you stay sat next to them? If you’d move, they’re probably not the instructor for you…

3) Reviews. In today’s world of information overload, reviews are a great way of getting answers to your questions, from real people. If your potential driving instructor has lots of (good) reviews, they’re probably doing something right! Check places like Yell.com or Facebook.

4) Professionalism. You are paying your instructor for a professional service, so as much as you need to get along with your instructor, they need to be professional too. Professionalism can be shown in lots of different ways. For example, at driving-pro, our instructors like to dress professionally and keep their cars are clean inside and out. There’s nothing worse than getting in a dirty car!

5) Answering the phone. If you phone a driving instructor directly and they don’t answer, that’s a good thing! They’re probably out driving, respecting the fact they’re working and respecting the law. Don’t get put off, just leave a message and they’ll get back to you!

6) Code of Conduct. Has your chosen driving instructor signed a Code of Conduct? Ask this question! You should also find out if your instructor has terms and conditions, then you’ll both be on the same page!

7) Do you feel comfortable with your driving instructor? If you don’t, we suggest finding a new instructor. There’s nothing wrong with that! At driving-pro, all of our students know that if they ever have an issue or they’d like to speak to someone who isn’t their instructor, they are able to. It’s important to us that our pupils are happy and comfortable.

8) Don’t get hung up on pass rates. It’s easy to, we know. You will pass your test. You will pass your test in your own time, and it mainly comes down to your commitment, the number of miles spent on the road and your confidence.

9) Instructor grade. There are two grades, A and B. The grade is supplied by the government. At driving-pro, although we take grades into account, most important for us is professionalism, people skills, ability and teaching methods but never be afraid to ask for credentials.

10) Price. Learning to drive is an investment. Of course, cheap lessons or special deals such as ten hours for £99 or the first five for £55 are attractive but ask yourself, why these lessons are so cheap? A good and in demand driving instructor will charge appropriately for their service, which ultimately could end up costing you less.

If you want to find out more about any of driving-pro’s instructors, you can give us a call on 02392 75 25 25 or check out their profiles!

Request A Callback

Looking for a driving school with a high pass rate and a great reputation?

02392 752 525

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